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Installing Python/Plone for PyCamp

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Because this PyCamp is part of Plone Symposium East, we will use the Plone 4 installers to get Python.

Contents

OSX
Windows
Linux

Installing Python/Plone on OSX 10.5 or 10.6

If you have not already installed the Xcode disc which came with your OSX, you should do so before performing any of the rest of this procedure.

  1. Download the Plone 4 beta 3 installer for OSX.
  2. Click on the downloaded DMG file to mount the disc image and open the Finder on the image.
  3. You'll notice a handy ReadMe.html file on the disc image. You might want to click on it to read it in your browser.
  4. Click on the MPKG file on the disc image to start the installer.
  5. Click Continue on the installer to move past the Introduction dialog.
  6. Click on "Plone" underneath the "Location" heading and a drop down menu will appear. You are going to choose a different location to install this Plone so that you don't overwrite any other Plone installation you may already have on your machine.
  7. On the drop down menu, choose "Other" to make a directory dialog appear.
  8. Navigate to your home folder under "Places" in the left hand navigation bar of the directory dialog. Then navigate to the "Applications" folder inside your home folder.
  9. Click on "New Folder" after you have navigated to your home Applications folder and create a new folder in your home Applications folder called "Plone4" (all one word, no spaces).
  10. Click on "Choose" to make ~/Applications/Plone4 the installation location for Python and Plone.
  11. Click on the little grey arrow beside "Plone" underneath the "Package Name heading" to make a checklist of install options appear.
  12. Check "ZEO Cluster." This will uncheck "Stand-Alone Instance," which is a mutually exclusive install option.
  13. Do not check "Production Mode Install" or "Install Startup Item."
  14. Click Continue. Click Install.
  15. When prompted, pick an administrative password. It is customary to pick "admin" as an administrative password for these disposable Plone instances. It's easy to remember admin/admin and you won't have to create an Emergency Zope User if you forget it.
  16. Your Mac's fan will probably turn on. In about three minutes on a slow Mac, the installer will start your browser to bid you "Welcome to your Plone installation."
  17. You can follow the welcome instructions and start Plone if you want. But we won't worry about it for PyCamp. It's there if you'd like to play with it.
  18. Click Close on the installer.
  19. Close the Finder window started by the disc image.
  20. Eject the disc image.
  21. Your new Python will be at ~/Applications/Plone4/Python-2.6/bin/python. You can play with it.
  22. But please do not use bin/easy_install to pollute your brand new Python installation with third party packages before PyCamp. You will be shown a way to make virtual private Pythons in class that you can pollute to your heart's content and then throw away.

Installing Python/Plone on Windows

Note: I have not tested this on Windows 7. Windows 7 is known to make a lot of non-Microsoft installers blow up. You have been warned.

  1. Log into Windows as a user with administrative privileges on the machine (able to install programs).
  2. Download the Plone 4 beta 2 installer for Windows.
  3. The beta 3 installer for Windows is not out yet. This is not our worry as we are just looking for the isolated Python 2.6.4 which the Windows Plone 4 installer installs. So we can use Plone 4 beta 2 on Windows just as well for PyCamp. Python 2.6.4 is also not functionally different from Python 2.6.5.
  4. Double click on the installer to run it.
  5. Tell Windows, yes, I really want to run the installer, for however many times it asks. Do what you have to do.
  6. Click Next to get past the installer Welcome dialog.
  7. When asked on the "Selection Destination Location" dialog, change the install location from C:\Program Files\Plone to C:\Program Files\Plone4.
  8. Click Next to go to the "Instance Setup" dialog.
  9. Use admin for a Username and admin for a Password on the "Instance Setup" dialog.
  10. Click Next to go to the "Ready to Install" dialog. Click Install to show that you really mean it.
  11. In about seven minutes on a really slow netbook, you will see the "Completing the Plone Setup Wizard" dialog.
  12. Uncheck "Start the Plone Controller" unless you really want to wait for Plone to start up.
  13. Be sure "Start Plone automatically when starting this computer" is unchecked unless you really want to wait for Plone every time you reboot.
  14. Don't worry, the Windows Plone installer installs a handy-dandy Plone controller which can start Plone for you any time your like, and shut Plone down when you are done playing with it. You will be able to find the Plone controller under Start->Programs->Plone if you want to play with Plone after the installer finishes.
  15. Click Finish to close the installer program.
  16. Your new Python will be at "C:\Program Files\Plone4\python\python.exe. You can play with it.
  17. But please do not use Scripts/easy_install.exe to pollute your brand new Python installation with third party packages before PyCamp. You will be shown a way to make virtual private Pythons in class that you can pollute to your heart's content and then throw away.

Installing Python/Plone on Linux

Python 2.6.5 is already installed on most modern *nix systems. But it is the system Python used heavily by your operating system. We don't want to pollute it. So we will install our own private Python with the Plone 4 installer.

  1. Log into Linux as your normal user, not as root.
  2. Make sure you have the equivalent of the following prerequisites installed from your Linux repository before proceeding:
    • zlib-dev
    • libjpeg-dev
    • openssl-dev
    • libreadline-dev
    • tk-dev
  3. These prerequisites may go by different names on different *nix distributions.
  4. If you cannot install them, the Plone installer will try to install private copies of them for you. But it is better to have them already installed. Trust me.
  5. Download the Plone 4 beta 3 installer for Linux tarball.
  6. Untar the file. On some Linux you may be able to do this by simply clicking on the file in a file manager window. On others you will need to issue to following command from a terminal prompt in the directory where you have downloaded the tarball:
    tar -xzvf Plone-4.0b3-UnifiedInstaller-20100506.tgz
  7. If you have not already opened a terminal prompt, do so and change directories to the Plone-4.0b3-UnifiedInstaller subdirectory you have just created by expanding the tarball.
  8. You may notice a README.txt in the subdirectory. You might read it with your favorite reading tool. less README.txt works just fine.
  9. Issue the following command:
    ./install.sh --target=$HOME/Plone4 zeo | tee install.stdout
  10. On a slow laptop, things run along for about for about five minutes. Your laptop fan may come on.
  11. If your are successful, you will see an "Installation Complete" message.
  12. If you like you can start up Plone according to the instructions on screen. It isn't necessary, though. It's just there for you to play with if you like and know how.
  13. Don't worry about writing down the administrative password shown on the screen. You can always find it again at $HOME/Plone4/zeocluster/adminPassword.txt.
  14. Your new Python is available at $HOME/Plone4/Python-2.6/bin/python. You can play with it.
  15. But please do not use bin/easy_install to pollute your brand new Python installation with third party packages before PyCamp. You will be shown a way to make virtual private Pythons in class that you can pollute to your heart's content and then throw away.